Our Experiential Approach

The appliance of neuroscience driving our experiential approach.


Brain Approach


For lawyers to learn how to use new tools and skills back in their workplace, they need to be able to practise using them… in their workplace. However, they also need to make mistakes, try lots of approaches, pause and reflect, receive honest feedback, rewind and replay and ultimately do it over and over until it becomes second nature.

Unfortunately, their real life workplace is not a desirable place for them to do this. The consequences could be catastrophic.  Which is why they keep doing things as they always have done.

Luckily, we can create an alternate workplace environment where they can safely do all of the above. And to populate that workplace we use the real McCoy. By using professional actors who understand the jargon and have first-hand experience of the legal environment, culture and activities, we ensure that the alternate workplace is as real as possible. And this ensures that the learning is real and directly applicable.

THE APPLIANCE OF NEUROSCIENCE

PRACTICE PRACTICE PRACTICE

Scientific research suggests that practice is a critical element of effective learning. We learn very effectively by doing.

PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT

Listen here, perfectionist lawyers everywhere. Neural pathways associated with new habits of behaviour can only be created through practice and repetition. Active engagement leads to changes in neural circuitry.

LITTLE AND OFTEN

Long-term sustained behavioural change is best realised by practice and repetition that is appropriately spaced. In order to promote memory consolidation, which is an important component of learning something properly, we really do need to sleep on thing.

KEEP IT REAL

Experiential simulations must be realistic in order to provide an effective learning experience. Adding an emotional experience to the physical experience increases learning by activating emotional memory as an additional resource.

WE ALL LOVE PRAISE

Motivation (especially intrinsic) and reward (intrinsic and extrinsic) is a key component at all stages of learning and helps to reinforce effective behaviour.

ONE SIZE FITS ALL

False.  We all have different ‘stretch zones’: times when there’s enough arousal in the brain to promote increased learning (and with it the formation of stronger memories), without unhelpful levels of anxiety.

AH, NOW I GET IT!

The combination of seeing, hearing and doing activates more sensory hardware in the brain than activating one system alone and so strengthens the depth of the learning.

Our Experiential Approach - PCA LAW